Distraindo Destino
http://flavors.me/renanbossi
Distraindo Destino
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really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
really-shit:

Papersky - Florian Mueller
"The sky is changing. Constantly. As if it was never satisfied with it’s design, it’s color, the shape and texture of the clouds.
Like a writer who is never satisfied with his sentences, words and ideas. Throwing away more and more crumpled paper, building a pile of lost and littered ideas.
But sometimes it is worth to break out of this circle and pause for a moment, to dwell and reflect on rejected plans to build something new.
My goal is to invite the viewer of my work to linger, to calm down and maybe to contemplate. 
Maybe I can achieve this with the coalescence of these two ingredients: Papersky.”
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designed-for-life:

DIALOG have designed the Southlands Residence in Vancouver, Canada.
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signalstonoise:

Has it really been a year since I was moping around getting all angsty to this beautifully ugly piece of work? Regardless, I’m listening now, and it still bludgeons as ruthlessly as ever. #converge #allweloveweleavebehind #deathwish @deathwishinc #deathwishinc #metalcore #hardcore #amazing #autumnjams #falljams #autumn #fall
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New Moon by David Lados

New Moon by David Lados

New Moon by David Lados
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enochliew:

Absence of Water by Gigi Cifali
Soho Marshall Pool in London, Moseley Baths in Birmingham, and Hornsey Baths in London.  
enochliew:

Absence of Water by Gigi Cifali
Soho Marshall Pool in London, Moseley Baths in Birmingham, and Hornsey Baths in London.  
enochliew:

Absence of Water by Gigi Cifali
Soho Marshall Pool in London, Moseley Baths in Birmingham, and Hornsey Baths in London.  
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enochliew:

Landscape Monolith by Reynald Drouhin
The Paris-based artist focuses on the vivid colors and crisp lines of nature to produce his abstract scenes.
enochliew:

Landscape Monolith by Reynald Drouhin
The Paris-based artist focuses on the vivid colors and crisp lines of nature to produce his abstract scenes.
enochliew:

Landscape Monolith by Reynald Drouhin
The Paris-based artist focuses on the vivid colors and crisp lines of nature to produce his abstract scenes.
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markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
markcareaga:

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII
Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.
The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)
Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore
Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect
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